How To Make Yourself More Appealing To Recruiters

Credit: Jerry Maguire 1996

Help Me Help You Help Us

When deciding to immigrate to a new country, it’s a big step! But you don’t need me to tell you that, you already know it, you’re living and breathing it as I type. For whatever reason, you have decided to make that life-changing decision, pack up your family and move to greener pastures half a world away. You’ve been sold on the lifestyle, the environment, perhaps even the people, and now you simply need that job you’ve been told your skills are in such high demand for. Now comes the hard part (as if everything up to this point wasn’t hard enough!). You obviously want to secure a job before you move, but put yourself in the shoes of a recruiter/hiring manager based in your destination country. You’re recruiting for a role and have received tons of applicants both domestically and abroad – are you more likely to look at candidates domestically who match the job description pretty well, or international candidates with no work visa? You could be the best of the best, but when it comes to humans, unfortunately the easiest option sometimes prevails. So what to do? Well consider partnering up with a respected recruiter who has experience placing international candidates domestically, such as us – the team at CareerJunctionLtd. It’s always good to have another advocate in your corner, but it’s important not to leave a recruiter with too much ground to cover. So help me, help you, help us!

Here’s a few simple tips that will help your recruiter help you into the job of your dreams in your new chosen land:

  • Stop applying through job boards!
    I know this sounds counter-productive, but for the reasons I mentioned above, you are unlikely to get a look in when competing with domestic candidates who are easier to screen, interview and place. There is a real misconception that by firing off your CV to as many companies as possible, the laws of average state you are bound to get a bite on something. In actual fact, you are doing the exact opposite- you are becoming what is known as a “serial applier”. You’re that guy that has an HR division or recruitment company high-fiving and cheering when they see your CV come in yet again, “Yes! Joe Bloggs again, that’s 5 today all for different roles”. You really don’t want to be this person as no-one will take you seriously.

 

  • Research, Research, Research!
    You need to understand what you are getting yourself into. Make sure you conduct thorough research into the employment market of your destination country. You should know the market trends and where growth areas are and how you can fit in or adapt. Explaining your value to a recruiter is gold- they can’t sell you to an organisation without knowing what they are promoting. The same research also applies to the companies you have decided to target, you need to know them inside out- who they are, what they do and where they are going.

 

  • Instead, talk with your recruiter and come up with a list of target companies
    The main reason you would use a recruiter is due to their connections in the market, so it makes sense to make the most of these. Talk with your recruiter and have a conversation around the types of companies that could benefit from your skills. A good recruiter should be able to give you several companies he/she can see you fitting in to.

 

  • Understand what you are getting yourself into
    We need to make it as easy as possible for companies to bring you on board, which means as little hassle as possible when it comes to getting your visa and start date sorted. Make sure all your ducks are in a row when it comes to immigration, so the only thing you are waiting on is a job offer. Companies aren’t going to wait 3 months for you to get everything sorted out.

 

  • Show you are committed
    There is nothing worse than spending time on an international candidate, only to have them back out and decide they are staying put. If you are at the point of engaging with employers or recruiters you can’t be doing so to simply test the waters. Finding a job is a full time job and you need to be actively involved in the process. Make yourself available to take phone calls or Skype chats. Where possible, set aside a few months to spend in your destination country to interview in person.

 

  • Don’t rely solely on the recruiter
    Let me be clear- this doesn’t mean apply on job boards! One of the key lessons from our Jobzdojo programme is teaching candidates how to go about building connections in their field. Get involved in relevant groups on LinkedIn and contribute where you can. Identify your peers in your target market and go about building connections with them. By talking with people in your industry, you are going to gain invaluable connections that will ultimately lead to employment opportunities.

So in the words of Jerry Maguire “Help me, help you!” Just imagine me saying this to you (yeah you can have a laugh), but I’m actually serious and probably equally as passionate.

 

No one ever said immigrating to a new country was easy, but it certainly helps to know what you are up against. By making a potential recruiter/hiring manager’s job as easy as possible, you are helping to remove the objections to hiring an offshore candidate. The key thing to remember is, you need to be an active participant in the process. At Jobzdojo, we equip you with the tools and techniques necessary to get you that job you need. Be sure to check us out and read about the fantastic success stories from those who have been through the programme have to share.

Eamonn Dunn

920 Recruitment, Auckland